Quina Brook Shropshire – Saturday 20th January – 60 acres of maize stubble

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QUINA BROOK POSTCODE SY13 2RD Gilberts Lane. Look out for the LGD flag. Please do not arrive before 7.30am dig starts at 9am. Thanks

 

This event will be held on 60 acres of undetected maize stubble that is only 2.7 miles from Wem. Please take care when registering as there is now 3 registration forms, please ensure you register on the correct one.

 

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Shropshire

The area was once part of the lands of the Cornovii, which consisted of the modern day counties of Cheshire, Shropshire, north Staffordshire, north Herefordshire and eastern parts of Powys. This was a tribal Celtic iron age kingdom. Their capital in pre-Roman times was probably a hill fort on the Wrekin. Ptolemy’s 2nd century Geography names one of their towns as being Viroconium Cornoviorum (Wroxeter), which became their capital under Roman ruleand one of the largest settlements in Britain. After the Roman occupation of Britain ended in the 5th century, the Shropshire area was in the eastern part of the Welsh Kingdom of Powys; known in Welsh poetry as the Paradise of Powys. It was annexed to the Angle kingdom of Mercia by King Offa in the 8th century, at which time he built two significant dykes there to defend his territory against the Welsh or at least demarcate it. In subsequent centuries, the area suffered repeated Danish invasion, and fortresses were built at Bridgnorth and Chirbury.

After the Norman conquest in 1066, major estates in Shropshire were granted to Normans, including Roger de Montgomerie, who ordered significant constructions, particularly in Shrewsbury, the town of which he was Earl. Many defensive castles were built at this time across the county to defend against the Welsh and enable effective control of the region, including Ludlow Castle and Shrewsbury Castle. The western frontier with Wales was not finally determined until the 14th century. Also in this period, a number of religious foundations were formed, the county largely falling at this time under the Diocese of Hereford and that of Coventry and Lichfield. Some parishes in the north-west of the county in later times fell under the Diocese of St. Asaph until the disestablishment of the Church in Wales in 1920, when they were ceded to the Lichfield diocese.

The county was a central part of the Welsh Marches during the medieval period and was often embroiled in the power struggles between powerful Marcher Lords, the Earls of Marchand successive monarchs.

The county contains a number of historically significant towns, including Shrewsbury, Bridgnorth and Ludlow (which was the seat of the Council of Wales and the Marches). Additionally, the area around Coalbrookdale in the county is seen as highly significant, as it is regarded as one of the birthplaces of the Industrial Revolution. The village of Edgmond, near Newport, is the location of the lowest recorded temperature (in terms of weather) in England and Wales.

 

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Wem

The name of the town is derived from the Old English wamm, meaning a marsh, as marshy land exists in the area of the town. Over time, this was corrupted to form “Wem”.

The area now known as Wem is believed to have been settled prior to the Roman Conquest of Britain, by the Cornovii, Celtic Iron Age settlers. The town is recorded in the Domesday Book as consisting of four manors in the hundred of Hodnet. In 1202, Wem became a market town. From the 12th century revisions to the hundreds of Shropshire, Wem was within the North Division of Bradford Hundred until the end of the 19th century.

The Domesday Book records that Wem was held by William Pantulf, First Lord of Wem, from Earl Roger.

The town supported the Parliamentarians in the English Civil War, and was subject to an attack by Lord Capel, in which the town held off the attackers. In 1677, a fire destroyed many of the wooden buildings in the town.

Within the town the sweet pea was first commercially cultivated, under the variety named Eckford Sweet Pea, after its inventor, nursery-man Henry Eckford. He first introduced a variety of the sweet pea in 1882, and set up in Wem in 1888, developing and producing many more varieties. There is a road to signify the Eckford name, called Eckford Park (within Wem). Each year, the Eckford Sweet Pea Society of Wem hold a sweet pea festival. In Victorian times, the town was known as “Wem, where the sweet peas grow”.

Brewing, initially a ‘cottage industry’, was carried out in Wem as early as 1700, when Richard Gough wrote of a contemporary in his History of Myddle a Latin aphorism he translated: Let slaves admire base things, but my friend still/My cup and can with Wem’s stoute ale shall fill. By 1900 a Shrewsbury and Wem Brewery Company traded on a widespread scale after acquiring the brewery in Noble Street previously run by Charles Henry Kynaston. The company was taken over in turn by Greenall Whitley & Co Ltd but the brewery was closed in 1988. From 1986 to 1989 the brewery served as the shirt sponsor for Shrewsbury Town.

More recently, it has been popularly known as the siting of the so-called Wem ghost. In 1995 an amateur photographer photographed a blaze which destroyed Wem Town Hall; the photo appeared to show the ghostly figure of a young female in a window of the burning building, dressed in ‘old-fashioned’ clothes. Although the photographer (who died in 2005) denied forgery, after his death it was suggested that the girl in his photo bore a ‘striking similarity’ with one in a postcard of the town from 1922.

 

IMPORTANT NOTICE REGARDING ALL LET’S GO DIGGING EVENTS

Please note: We expect all finds to be shown for photographing, all items considered treasure for the finder to provide identification and a contact number. Whilst it is not our responsibility to report items of treasure found on our digs, we will advise the finder to do so and expect confirmation it has been done. And finds of this nature not reported will result in the finders details being passed to the relevant authority.

The event will start at 9am after a short briefing so please arrive between 8am and 8.45am. Digging finishes at 4.30pm. 

There will be NO catering at this event so please bring food and refreshments with you.

If you can no longer attend after registering for the event please UN REGISTER, failure to do so can result in you being blocked from all future LGD events.

Non paid members £20
Paid members with a membership card £15
Under 16s free (no need to register)

 

Comments

  1. Profile photo of Andrew Rose

    Andrew Rose

    14/01/2018

    Seems to space for cars ,wanted to book my self and Steve white as a passenger, is it possible

  2. Profile photo of Seaglass

    Seaglass

    16/01/2018

    Hi Jo. Had to unregister my ‘car’ place for this dig. Please allocate to a another and good luck !

  3. Profile photo of Andrew Rose

    Andrew Rose

    17/01/2018

    Will have pull name off dig as Steve White my passenger cannot log in to register as guest/ pasenger

    • Profile photo of Joanne Boyce

      Joanne Boyce

      19/01/2018

      Hi Andrew don’t worry about registering for the event now if you still want to attend with your guest that’s fine. Thanks

  4. Profile photo of Ian kenzitt

    Ian kenzitt

    19/01/2018

    Hi paul
    Please remove me from the dig. Iank number 6 passenger. Unfortunately i dont know what day of the week it is and thought the dig was Sunday.
    Sorry
    Regards Ian

  5. Profile photo of Darrell

    Darrell

    20/01/2018

    Hi Paul could you please take me of the list sorry daughter up all night tooth ache .good luck all for today once again sorry

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